ver fotos
  • Niños y jóvenes de Manila en Filipinas deben subir una montaña o a un árbol para continuar con sus estudios, a la vez de que algunos tienen que trabajar para ayudar a sus familiares.
    Una lápida o un árbol, el reposo del lápiz para aprender en Filipinas
    Grade 5 student Lovely Joy De Castro, 11, takes notes while attending an online class using a smartphone, as schools remain closed during the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, at Manila South Cemetery where she lives with her family in Makati City, Philippines, November 6, 2020. “I just hope that she finishes school, gets a good job, and ultimately finds a life outside this cemetery,” said Castro’s grandmother Angeline Delos Santos about her granddaughter. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez SEARCH “LOPEZ SCHOOL ONLINE” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
  • Niños y jóvenes de Manila en Filipinas deben subir una montaña o a un árbol para continuar con sus estudios, a la vez de que algunos tienen que trabajar para ayudar a sus familiares.
    Una lápida o un árbol, el reposo del lápiz para aprender en Filipinas
    Jhay Ar Calma, 10, a grade 5 student, is helped by his mother Jonalyn Parulan as he prepares to take part in an online class with a tablet, provided to him by the local government, as schools remain closed during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in their home in Sta. Mesa, Manila, Philippines, October 30, 2020. “Sometimes we change the SIM card to a different provider so he doesn’t have to study on the roof, but there’s rarely enough money to spare for that,” Parulan told Reuters. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez SEARCH “LOPEZ SCHOOL ONLINE” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES
  • Niños y jóvenes de Manila en Filipinas deben subir una montaña o a un árbol para continuar con sus estudios, a la vez de que algunos tienen que trabajar para ayudar a sus familiares.
    Una lápida o un árbol, el reposo del lápiz para aprender en Filipinas
    Jhay Ar Calma, 10, a grade 5 student, sits on the roof of his home as he takes part in an online class using a tablet, due to weak internet connection in his area, as schools remain closed during the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Sta. Mesa, Manila, Philippines, October 30, 2020. “Sometimes we change the SIM card to a different provider so he doesn’t have to study on the roof, but there’s rarely enough money to spare for that,” said Jhay’s mother Jonalyn Parulan. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez SEARCH “LOPEZ SCHOOL ONLINE” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
  • Niños y jóvenes de Manila en Filipinas deben subir una montaña o a un árbol para continuar con sus estudios, a la vez de que algunos tienen que trabajar para ayudar a sus familiares.
    Una lápida o un árbol, el reposo del lápiz para aprender en Filipinas
    Jonathan Ticzon, 11, a grade 6 student, listens to his father Ricardo Ticzon as he teaches him at their home surrounded by siblings and cousins, as schools remain closed during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Makati City, Philippines, November 10, 2020. “It’s important for me to finish school so I can get a good job, and teach my future kids everything I know—just like how my father is to me,” said Jonathan. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez SEARCH “LOPEZ SCHOOL ONLINE” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES
  • Niños y jóvenes de Manila en Filipinas deben subir una montaña o a un árbol para continuar con sus estudios, a la vez de que algunos tienen que trabajar para ayudar a sus familiares.
    Una lápida o un árbol, el reposo del lápiz para aprender en Filipinas
    Mary Joyce Florendo, 8, a grade 3 student, is helped by her mother while working on her learning modules, as schools remain closed during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, at their home in Manila, Philippines, November 10, 2020. “It’s important for me to finish my studies so I can help my parents in the future,” said Florendo. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez SEARCH “LOPEZ SCHOOL ONLINE” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES
  • Niños y jóvenes de Manila en Filipinas deben subir una montaña o a un árbol para continuar con sus estudios, a la vez de que algunos tienen que trabajar para ayudar a sus familiares.
    Una lápida o un árbol, el reposo del lápiz para aprender en Filipinas
    Daniella Nicole Cabasines, 11, a grade 5 student, works on her learning modules at an evacuation center for residents affected by the onslaught of Typhoon Vamco, as schools remain closed during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Kasiglahan Village, Rodriguez, Rizal, Philippines, November 27, 2020. “When the flood started to rise, the first thing on my mind was to save my modules. I forgot about my clothes, but not my modules. The last time there was a typhoon, we received a lot of clothes from donations, but I thought no one could give me back my modules,” said Cabasines. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez SEARCH “LOPEZ SCHOOL ONLINE” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES
  • Niños y jóvenes de Manila en Filipinas deben subir una montaña o a un árbol para continuar con sus estudios, a la vez de que algunos tienen que trabajar para ayudar a sus familiares.
    Una lápida o un árbol, el reposo del lápiz para aprender en Filipinas
    Jean Irish Del Rosario, 13, a grade 7 student, takes part in an online class using a tablet that is connected to a Sundries store’s WiFi vending machine, as schools remain closed during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, at Tondo, Manila, Philippines, November 10, 2020. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez SEARCH “LOPEZ SCHOOL ONLINE” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES
  • Niños y jóvenes de Manila en Filipinas deben subir una montaña o a un árbol para continuar con sus estudios, a la vez de que algunos tienen que trabajar para ayudar a sus familiares.
    Una lápida o un árbol, el reposo del lápiz para aprender en Filipinas
    Mark Joseph Andal, 18, a college student, takes part in an online class through a smartphone at a forest hut where there is internet connection, following the suspension of physical classes during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Mabalanoy, San Juan, Batangas, Philippines October 15, 2020. Andal has taken a part-time job in construction to purchase a smartphone for virtual classes and has also built a forest shelter to capture an internet signal. When the signal fades, Andal picks up his plastic chair to move to another spot, and if it rains, he holds the phone in one hand and an umbrella in the other. “We’re not rich, and finishing school is my only way to repay my parents for raising me.” REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez SEARCH “LOPEZ SCHOOL ONLINE” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
  • Niños y jóvenes de Manila en Filipinas deben subir una montaña o a un árbol para continuar con sus estudios, a la vez de que algunos tienen que trabajar para ayudar a sus familiares.
    Una lápida o un árbol, el reposo del lápiz para aprender en Filipinas
    Nhieshalyn Galicia, 8, a grade 2 student, works on a school assignment at her home, as schools remain closed during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Manila, Philippines, January 6, 2021. “I actually think it would be much better if they postpone schooling for the meantime because not all parents are capable of teaching their children. It’s really difficult and time-consuming, especially for me with two children. Sometimes they have questions that are difficult for me to answer,” said Nhieshalyn’s mother, Judelyn Margot Arnaiz. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez SEARCH “LOPEZ SCHOOL ONLINE” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES
  • Niños y jóvenes de Manila en Filipinas deben subir una montaña o a un árbol para continuar con sus estudios, a la vez de que algunos tienen que trabajar para ayudar a sus familiares.
    Una lápida o un árbol, el reposo del lápiz para aprender en Filipinas
    College students Jenebyl Cipres, 19, Almer Acuno, 21, Jester Rafon, 20, and Rosemine Gonzaga, 19, work on online worksheets in a hut on a mountain, as their community does not have enough signal for internet connection, following the suspension of physical classes during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Sitio Papatahan, Paete, Laguna, Philippines, October 22, 2020. “I always fear I wouldn’t be able to follow along to our lessons compared to my classmates who are in a better situation, in a more comfortable environment. I’m not jealous because I’m used to this way of living. I’m just scared to be left behind,” said Rafon. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez SEARCH “LOPEZ SCHOOL ONLINE” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES
  • Niños y jóvenes de Manila en Filipinas deben subir una montaña o a un árbol para continuar con sus estudios, a la vez de que algunos tienen que trabajar para ayudar a sus familiares.
    Una lápida o un árbol, el reposo del lápiz para aprender en Filipinas
    Mark Joseph Andal, 18, a college student, tries to find a spot in the forrest where there is an internet connection, in order to take part in an online class using his smartphone following the suspension of physical classes during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Mabalanoy, San Juan, Batangas, Philippines October 15, 2020. Andal has taken a part-time job in construction to purchase a smartphone for virtual classes and has also built a forest shelter to capture an internet signal. When the signal fades, Andal picks up his plastic chair to move to another spot, and if it rains, he holds the phone in one hand and an umbrella in the other. “We’re not rich, and finishing school is my only way to repay my parents for raising me.” REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez SEARCH “LOPEZ SCHOOL ONLINE” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES
  • Niños y jóvenes de Manila en Filipinas deben subir una montaña o a un árbol para continuar con sus estudios, a la vez de que algunos tienen que trabajar para ayudar a sus familiares.
    Una lápida o un árbol, el reposo del lápiz para aprender en Filipinas
    Annie Sabino, 16, a grade 9 student, completes her school work next to her dog, while tending to her family’s sidewalk eatery beside their home, as schools remain closed during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Manila, Philippines, January 6, 2021. “I often wake up late for class from staying up too late finishing online schoolwork, as the signal is better at night,” said Sabino. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez SEARCH “LOPEZ SCHOOL ONLINE” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES
  • Niños y jóvenes de Manila en Filipinas deben subir una montaña o a un árbol para continuar con sus estudios, a la vez de que algunos tienen que trabajar para ayudar a sus familiares.
    Una lápida o un árbol, el reposo del lápiz para aprender en Filipinas
    Almer Acuno, 21, an agriculture college student, uses a smartphone to take part in an online class as he sits inside a hut on top of a mountain where there is internet connection, following the suspension of physical classes to prevent the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Sitio Papatahan, Paete, Laguna, Philippines, October 22, 2020. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez SEARCH “LOPEZ SCHOOL ONLINE” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES

FOTOS | Sobre cementerios o en el techo de su casa, así estudian niños y jóvenes en Filipinas

FOTOS | Sobre cementerios o en el techo de su casa, así estudian niños y jóvenes en Filipinas
En Manila, Filipinas, el cierre de escuelas por la pandemia de Covid-19 ha obligado a miles de alumnos a buscar otras alternativas para poder estudiar, como desde subir una montaña o sentarse sobre una lápida o en el techo de su casa.

En Manila, Filipinas, muchas familias luchan con la tutoría en casa ante las escuelas cerradas por la pandemia. Joy de Castro tiene 11 años, vive en una casa improvisada sobre un cementerio y a veces estudia sentada sobre lápidas para evitar meterse bajo los pies de su familia cocinando pollo para venderlo a los visitantes.

“Sé que no le hemos dado suficiente orientación en la escuela”, apuntó la abuela de Castro, Angeline Delos Santos, “pero si no nos ocupamos de nuestro negocio, no tendríamos nada para alimentar a los niños”. “Solo espero que termine la escuela, consiga un buen trabajo y finalmente encuentre una vida fuera de este cementerio”, añadió.

Desde que la pandemia lo obligó a aprender a distancia, Jhay Ar Calma, de 10 años, a menudo ha tenido que subirse al techo de hierro corrugado de su casa en un barrio pobre para obtener una señal de Internet.

En el techo, se sienta en un recipiente de plástico roto y espera que haya una señal lo suficientemente fuerte para su dispositivo emitido por el gobierno.

“A veces cambiamos la tarjeta SIM a un proveedor diferente para que no tenga que estudiar en el techo, pero rara vez hay suficiente dinero para eso”, contó su madre Jonalyn Parulan.

<b>Sin esperanzas por regreso a clases</b>

Las esperanzas de un regreso a las aulas este mes se han desvanecido después de que el presidente Rodrigo Duterte revirtiera un plan para probar clases en persona en áreas de bajo riesgo, posponiendo cualquier reapertura indefinidamente mientras Filipinas lucha contra más de 480.000 infecciones por coronavirus, el segundo número más alto en el sureste de Asia.

El cambio a clases en línea, módulos de autoaprendizaje y programas de radio y televisión ha demostrado ser un gran desafío en un país de 108 millones donde menos de una quinta parte de los hogares tienen acceso a Internet y muchos carecen de dispositivos móviles.

Ya ha habido un aumento en el número de estudiantes que abandonan la escuela, según el Ministerio de Educación.

En la provincia de Laguna, al sur de Manila, los estudiantes suben una montaña para tener acceso a Internet e incluso han construido una cabaña para proporcionar refugio cuando llueve y para dormir cuando trabajan hasta altas horas de la noche en sus asignaciones.

Esta situación está muy lejos de la vida universitaria que Rosemine Gonzaga, de 19 años, había anticipado. “Estaba muy emocionada por la universidad porque toda mi vida he estado aquí en las montañas”, dijo, explicando cómo la pandemia había frustrado sus planes para una vida independiente en la ciudad.

Como muchos estudiantes de su comunidad, ella depende de una beca y teme perderla si no puede seguir el ritmo de las lecciones. Aún así, Gonzaga está resuelto a continuar con las clases en línea en lugar de correr el riesgo de infección asistiendo a la universidad. “La pandemia no es motivo para que deje de aprender”, contó.

<b>Estudiar y trabajar para un futuro mejor </b>

Mark Joseph Andal, de 18 años, que vive en San Juan, provincia de Batangas, ha aceptado un trabajo de medio tiempo en la construcción para comprar un teléfono inteligente para clases virtuales y también ha construido un refugio forestal para capturar una señal de Internet.

Cuando la señal se desvanece, Andal toma su silla de plástico para trasladarse a otro lugar, y si llueve, sostiene el teléfono en una mano y un paraguas en la otra. Menciona que no tiene otra opción. “No somos ricos, y terminar la escuela es mi única forma de pagarles a mis padres por criarme”.

Andal admite que se sintió aliviado y asustado cuando escuchó que las escuelas podrían reabrir. Las difíciles circunstancias lo han hecho más decidido a tener éxito."Quiero ser más activo en clase, quiero perseverar más, mejorar a pesar de la situación en la que estoy”, señaló.

07 enero, 2021
Azteca Noticias
Internacional - Galerias
Share
MÁS NOTICIAS